Splintered, A.G. Howard, 2011

This is my one chance to find Wonderland, to cleanse the Liddell bloodline of this curse, and to save Alison. A.G. Howard

Disclaimer 1: I don’t like Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Disclaimer 2: I am not the intended audience of this book

Participating in this book challenge has been an overall rewarding experience. Thanks to the wide-ranging categories I’ve read books I’d never pick up had it not met certain criteria.

On the flip side, sometimes those books I never would have read are books I would have been happy without, as is the case with Splintered.

The “character with your name” challenge has been problematic. Despite the rising popularity of the name Alyssa, the literary world lags.

I settled on Splintered, mostly out of desperation (see disclaimer 1). It’s a Young Adult Fantasy (see disclaimer 2) set in the Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland universe. Splintered is an imaginative continuance of the Wonderland saga, one in which Wonderland and the book Alice in Wonderland co-exist.

The main character, Alyssa Gardner, is the teen descendent of Alice Liddell, Carroll’s inspiration for Alice in Wonderland. Lewis and the rest of world consider Alice’s adventure to be childish make-believe. But the real Wonderland is a dark twisted realm lurking below. Alice’s visit left Wonderland’s inhabitants embroiled in political struggle and upheaval and only Alyssa can restore the balance.

Above ground Alice’s descendants suffered as well, victims of an insanity curse placed upon them for Alice’s transgressions. Alyssa, the great-great-great granddaughter of Alice, tries to break the curse to save her mother, Alison, from a scheduled lobotomy.

Following clues left by her Wonderland guide, Morpheus, Alyssa realizes Wonderland is not only real, it hides the cure to her mother’s insanity. Throughout her childhood Morpheus appeared either in the form of a moth or young boy her age so despite the bizarreness of the situation, she trusts him. Alyssa takes the plunge through the looking glass and embarks on a series of quests to repair what Alice broke and save her mother.

The story is compelling, though needlessly complicated, which fantasy stories lean towards. Rules for how magic works are doled out on a need to know basis and even then there’s always some exploitable loophole rendering the rules useless.

But that’s not the biggest problem Splintered has. It’s the characters.

Alyssa is an insufferable Mary Sue, who’s simply too delicate and fragile to be able to take on the quest alone. Enter Jeb, the overbearing lummox/love interest. Simply being Jeb makes him the authority in every situation, even when he has no clue. While Alyssa is certainly no expert, she’s still ahead of him in terms of information. She’s familiar not only with the Carroll story, but her own family’s history. She’s gathered clues. And yet when Jeb takes control, she demurs. In a world of powerful magic, Jeb is convinced his brute strength is more powerful. It isn’t.

After following her, uninvited, through the looking glass, he starts barking orders under the guise of “protecting” Alyssa. His sole motivation is to get them back home (Does he know how? No. No matter, he’s Jeb!), despite Alyssa’s quest to save her mother. With the guidance of the deceitful Morpheus, Alyssa traverses the whimsical landscape with Jeb dragging his feet the whole way. And yet somehow, she falls more in love with the oaf as they go.

Morpheus, Jeb’s romantic rival, brings out the worst in Jeb. And by worst, I mean the worst name-calling.

The dialogue is eye-rolling. Some of Jeb’s insults:

            “Hands off you son of a bug!”

            “I go where Al goes, dances-with-bugs.”

            “Take her silence as no, bug for brains.”

Sadly, despite his duplicity, Morpheus believes in Alyssa from the very beginning. He encourages her and implores her to see the inner strength that exists (it really doesn’t, but we’re told it’s there). Jeb, meanwhile, sees Alyssa as brittle and unsound, incapable of taking care of herself.

The best parts of the book happen toward the end when she leaves Jeb in a ditch and continues the journey on her own. Unfortunately, her thoughts are constantly on him and he seems to be her sole motivation. There were several times throughout the book I forgot that she was there to save her mother. Her universe revolves around Jeb.

Again, this book isn’t for me. Some of the teens side-eyed me as I invaded their part of the library. This is the kind of world where teenage girls yearn to belong to a guy and that guy will be completely theirs in some weird possessive pact. A world where the love interest is dating a beautiful, rich cold-hearted rival but just can’t seem to get his mind off Mary Sue Alyssa. A world where the only victory that matters is winning the boy.