A Cook’s Tour, Anthony Bourdain, 1998

CooksTour

I wanted kicks – the kind of melodramatic thrills and chills I’d yearned for since childhood, the kind of adventure I’d found as a little boy in the pages of my Tintin comic books.  Anthony Bourdain

I’ll admit, when Anthony Bourdain came onto the scene, I didn’t like him much. His disdainful alpha male attitude wrapped in a scrawny frame smacked of male posturing. And a chain-smoking food expert? Did he have any taste buds left to really make judgement calls on cuisine? I found him needlessly acerbic given his job was to literally fly all over the world and eat delicious food. But people change. As he got older, he mellowed and seemed to make peace with the commercial side of the tv programming that bankrolled his lifestyle.

His death in June shocked and saddened me deeper than I expected so I was compelled to read one of his many books. I had trouble deciding the category, since I have a slot for travel and one for a book with food on the cover (2018 Reading Challenge). I opted to give him the travel category.

Another confession, Bourdain’s death overshadowed my impression of the book. I found it hard to read the words he wrote 10 years ago without reflecting on how his story ultimately ended. Because of this, I’m not sure I can give it a fair review. I will say, that Bourdain writes the way he speaks (or vice versa). I heard his voice as if he was narrating an episode of a show. And the book was written as they were filming the show. So that gives you some indication of what the book is like.

His travels take him all over the world (Russia, Japan, Morocco, Mexico etc.). He didn’t just visit countries as a curious outsider, looking askance and mocking the “strange” foods set before him. He sat down with his hosts and learned about them and life in their country, the good and the bad. He became a reminder for us self-absorbed Americans that yes, other countries have amazing histories and cultures worth celebrating. He was a great ambassador, using food as the bridge between cultures. Despite his gruff exterior he also had a way of making people open up, even those who lived under regimes that would not appreciate the frankness.

Simply put, Bourdain respected people’s right to be different.

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