Cat’s Cradle, Kurt Vonnegut, 1963

Cat's Cradle

No damn cat, no damn cradle. Kurt Vonnegut

 

Spoilers

Happy Banned Book Week! (2018 Reading Challenge)

In 1972, the school board of Strongsville, OH banned Vonnegut’s work for… no specific reason. Apparently, someone just didn’t like it (Minarcini v. Strongsville City School District)

And what’s not to like?

A not-so-veiled critique of the self-serving fluidity of organized religion.

A not-so-covert jab at the sincerity of organized religion.

A not-so-subtle anti-nuclear weapons message.

A not-so-hidden contempt for authority figures who arrogantly assume they know what’s best.

I can’t imagine what entities would find these thoughts threatening.

So it goes.

Vonnegut’s story follows our narrator, John, who prefers to be called Jonah, as he goes from would-be-author to would-be-dictator in a short amount of time. We end up in a place not opposite of where we expected but more up, over and to the left.

Jonah’s wacky adventure…well, it’s too bizarre to really summarize and if I’m being completely honest, I’m not sure how we got from the beginning of the book to the end. It all seemed organic at the time. The short chapters propel the story forward at a brisk pace so there isn’t really time to take in the absurdity until the end when you realize just how much has transpired.

Vonnegut tackles big subjects in big ways.

He uses the fake religion of Bokonism to skewer the false comfort of organized religion. Jonah becomes enamored with Bokonism, a faith filled with dubious wisdom and bizarre rituals and built on lies. Even after finding out the religion was designed with disingenuous motives, Jonah still finds comfort in the teachings.

The non-existent Ice Nine stands in for nuclear weapons and Vonnegut doesn’t pretend there are pros and cons to its use. The bleak hopeless end of the novel pretty much sums up Vonnegut’s anti-nuke stance. The crux of the book asks the question “We can, but should we?” Vonnegut’s answer is clearly “No.”

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